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Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 26 Mar 17, 7:32 pm
by Don't Blink


Take away the jobs and dignity and this is what happens

Re: Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 26 Mar 17, 9:31 pm
by mugley
its disgraceful I think

Re: Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 26 Mar 17, 9:56 pm
by Don't Blink
The heartland has not recovered from the 2008 financial disaster

Re: Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 27 Mar 17, 10:08 am
by Jack Flash
The solution is jobs - but the cold hard truth is that these people are just not needed in today's economy.

In some areas Universal income is being considered - in others the solution is to let them fend for them selves.

Re: Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 27 Mar 17, 4:22 pm
by mugley
well her husband was in construction, had his own company, as a lot of the people that lost there jobs were (as she mentioned) that's not a job that robots will be taking over, anytime soon anyway

Re: Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 28 Mar 17, 8:07 am
by Jack Flash


SAM can do the work of 6 masons each day, he never requires a break, benefits or a paycheck.

Each SAM can be rented at a monthly cost of ~$3,300 according to The Sun. With an average efficiency of 3,000 bricks per day, that breaks down to about 4.5 cents per brick. At $15 per hour wage rate, plus benefits, and a daily efficiency of about 500 bricks brings the human labor cost equivalent to roughly 32 cents per brick, or a little over 7x.

Of course, SAM can't completely eliminate the need for masons on work sites just yet, as human assistance is still needed to load bricks and mortar into the system and to clean up excess mortar from joints after bricks have been laid. That said, Construction Robotics estimates that overall labor costs for bricklaying projects can be reduced by at least 50%.



It's not just construction - Self-Driving Truck Makes Beer Delivery




Re: Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 28 Mar 17, 2:01 pm
by mugley
I would like to see they bricklaying machine work in under less than ideal conditions, wet muddy clay on a steep terrains and etc, they show it working on a platform but that isn't going to get the lower bricks laid and they talk about windows but don't show how it will deal with one, especially one that the measurement is a neat half brick or, then this doesn't even include carpentry, plumbing and etc so its still a long way to go


self driving truck? wait till its in a wreck and the lawsuits begin

Re: Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 28 Mar 17, 8:15 pm
by Don't Blink
Automation can't do everything, but add one of those to a crew and you need 20 to 30 % fewer people.

Robots and Jobs: Evidence from US Labor Markets http://www.nber.org/papers/w23285

Because there are relatively few robots in the US economy, the number of jobs lost due to robots has been limited so far (ranging between 360,000 and 670,000 jobs, equivalent to a 0.18-0.34 percentage point decline in the employment to population ratio). However, if the spread of robots proceeds as expected by experts over the next two decades (e.g., Brynjolfsson and McAfee, 2012, especially pp. 27-32, and Ford, 2016), the future aggregate implications of the spread of robots could be much more sizable. For example, BCG (2015) offers two scenarios for the spread of robots over the next decade. In their aggressive scenario, the world stock of robots will quadruple by 2025. This would correspond to 5.25 more robots per thousand workers in the United States, and with our estimates, it would lead to a 0.94-1.76 percentage points lower employment to population ratio and 1.3-2.6 percent lower wage growth between 2015 and 2025.

Of course, the impact is even more dramatic when you consider that the job losses are heavily concentrated in a handful of industries. The automotive industry employs 39% of existing industrial robots, followed by the electronics industry (19%), metal products (9%), and the plastic and chemicals industry (9%).


Finally I know some of you will feel bad about this, but computers are replacing lawyers http://www.cnbc.com/2017/02/17/lawyers- ... gence.html

Re: Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 29 Mar 17, 1:20 pm
by Jack Flash
Six jobs are eliminated for every robot introduced into the workforce, a new study says - https://www.recode.net/2017/3/28/150944 ... industrial


This is turning into an automation bashing thread, but we need automation. We just need to figure out how to do it without disrupting peoples lives.

Re: Interview With a West Virginian

PostPosted: 29 Mar 17, 10:48 pm
by mugley
yep its probably inevitable

on the bright side, Star Trek Next Generation had solved that problem, no one in the world worked unless they wanted to